Harvey Walnut

What can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence

Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

Alien addresses Dail Eireann

with 2 comments

Alien addresses Dail Eireann

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So it seems the debate about the proper attire to wear when one is a parliamentarian rages on in old Hibernia.

Since the beginnings of the state politicians from all parts of Ireland have been trying heroically to seem more bourgeois than their proletarian roots would otherwise suggest, by stuffing themselves into off the rack suits; the odd fashionista may even have purchased a Louis Copeland special.

But since the general election, t-shirt wearing independents have been popping up in the back benches like irreverent weeds and no matter how many time the Ceann Comhairle waves his gavel and demands they respect the sobriety of the surroundings and have a little decorum, they just keep coming back.

Today in The Journal we have pictures of Luke Ming Flanagan wearing a bright orange Oscar the grouch t-shirt, standing up talking to the chamber.  To my surprise,  in the comments section under the piece raged a fierce debate on the issue.   The surprise being that so many people cared enough about such a non-issue they felt an irresistible desire to comment on it.

Honestly when it’s the politicians  shouting at each other saying, “my suit is better than your t-shirt” one despairs for the complexity of our political discourse.  When the plebs get arguing about it,well then I know we’re fucked.

Written by harveywalnut

July 20, 2012 at 3:39 pm

Wilie O’Dea and religious prejudice

with 4 comments

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Limerick TD and Fianna Fail attack dog, Willie O’Dea has according to the Irish Examiner claimed that Minister for Defence, Alan Shatter is “prejudiced against Catholics” because he refused to allow the army to provide a guard of honour for a procession at the recent International Eucharistic Congress.

How this amounts to prejudice is beyond me since I don’t see why the army has to or should provide any form of escort in a religious ceremony that has nothing to do with the state. Not to mind the waste of taxpayers money and that the army has better things to be doing.

Since Mr Shatter is Jewish, I also have to wonder would O’Dea have called a Catholic Minister for Defence prejudiced for making a similar decision. When looked at from this angle it adds a darker hue the O’Dea’s reasoning and should be viewed with the contempt it deserves.

O’Dea has spent his entire career turning up at bars and funerals in Limerick and doing very little else for the city. This smacks of an irrelevant politician from a dying party trying to court the Peoples Front of Judea.

However he wouldn’t be the first religious person in the country to shout prejudice now that the Government has realised we live in a multicultural state and has made moves towards a more secular republic, albeit slowly.

David Quinn, head of Iona Institute and regular contributor to the Independent, has made a career out of shrill warnings that the end is nigh because of the secularisation of the state and left-wing conspiracy. The slow demise and relevance of the Catholic Church in Ireland has the religious right clutching their rosary beads praying for a return to the good old days.

While it is easy to laugh at O’Dea and his ilk we shouldn’t forget that they represent two of the major hurdles Ireland has faced in becoming a modern secular republic. Parish pump politics and Religion. It should also remind us that neither has gone away.

Written by harveywalnut

July 17, 2012 at 5:25 pm

Constitutional Convention

leave a comment »

Messers Kenny and Gilmore, had a piece in the Irish Times yesterday outlining the details of the upcoming constitutional convention. 100 people in total, 60 of them random members of the public and the rest TDs and academics. All brought together to review, analyse and suggest alternatives to elements of our constitution. In essence it is an excercise to try and modernise how our political system works.

A noble endeavour, to be applauded. If of course it was going to modernise our institutions and change how politics works in Ireland. But the convention will only be discussing a limited range of issues that I would imagine almost everyone in the country already agrees on.

Are they really trying to suggest that the removal of the section in the constitution regarding women’s position in the home is something we need to discuss? or that the insane blasphemy law brought in by the monumentally corrupt and morally bankrupt Fianna Fail, is trailblazing modernising stuff?. Changing the voting age to 17 and limiting the presidential term to 5 years are all good ideas but if these are the only issues to be reviewed then it is clear that the entire convention is nothing but a sleight of hand trick to distract the masses from their increasingly vocal demands for change.

Our TDs do not legislate, they fix peoples social welfare problems and we have way too many of them for a country our size. New Zealand has 120 and we have over 166 most of whom do little or nothing except engage in the worst forms of parish pump politics. The opposition has zero influence on the government of the day and the executive essentially has no cheques and balances. We have seen the results of this in Biffos’s disastrous bank guarantee which helped sink the country into penury.

We also have a country that has a constitution riddled with references to the disgraced and medieval Catholic church. All references to Catholicism being the states main religion need to be removed and the guarantee of the separation of Church and state,religious freedom and plurality inserted in its place. This is of vital importance if we are to finally limit the power of the church in our society and create a true democratic republic.

But we now know the convention won’t even be discussing these issues, so when Kenny says that this is great opportunity for the public to get involved, he really means it’s a great opportunity for you think your involved but we’re going to pat you on the head and then head away and make only the changes we want.

Written by harveywalnut

July 12, 2012 at 12:02 pm

Morons and E-Voting Machines

leave a comment »

They cost the Irish tax payer 55 million Euro and were never used; because one of the many morons in Fianna Fail , one Martin Cullen, went against all advice, reports and even ignored the fact that the people selling them also mentioned that they didn’t quite work.

So today the debacle of the E-voting machines has ended because they were sold for….€70,267 to a scrap company.  So in honour of all the people who voted for Fianna Fail over the last 20 years and for Martin Cullen I’ve added this little video.

Fianna Fail Voters

Written by harveywalnut

June 29, 2012 at 11:38 am

Egypt and the Brotherhood

leave a comment »

20120625-033609 p.m..jpg

Watching the results of the presidential election in Egypt yesterday was both inspirational and worrying. What we take for granted here in democratic Europe, elections and peaceful change in power, was an historical event for the people of Egypt. The result was clearly cathartic and reassuring for the millions who voted regardless of the outcome and while Tahrir square may have been filled with supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood, the election was a victory for all Egyptians.

None the less the arrival of a democratically elected Islamic party into power in the largest state in the Middle East is a cause for concern. They have a clear mandate to introduce their manifesto and potentially a constitution based on Sharia Law.

However the realities of rule in a country with so many domestic problems and many other minority groups including the secularists, who made up the core of the initial revolution, will mean that the Brotherhood may find it far from easy to implement its agendas. When jobs and clean water are the priority of millions then trying ensure women cover themselves up and Israel bashing may be pushed to the side. Add that to an army that has shorn the presidency of any real power and in reality still control the majority of institutions in the country, the brotherhood may find themselves with a sysphian task just to implement the basics of their agenda.

While there will be much gnashing of teeth and hyperbole from certain political quarters, the Brotherhood, regardless of their Islamic nature have been democratically elected and American and European countries must learn to work with them constructively rather than criticising anything than smacks of non liberal thinking.

But most importantly the reason that this writer has hope, are the millions of women who voted in the election. The power of that vote is not to be underestimated and if the Brotherhood prove to be just another religious group of zealots pretending to play politics and the power to vote remains, millions of women will remove them from power.

I believe that the Arab spring must be as much about women’s emancipation and freedom as it is about the escape from dictatorship and religious medievalism. Egypt is a nation with many secular,educated and political women demanding a better future and they will not be silenced. Women like the human rights and political blogger Dalia Ziada will be watching and campaigning.

The Muslim Brotherhood cannot operate in isolation in this new Egypt nor can they ignore the rights of millions of women who have tasted the power of their vote. It will not be an easy transition and we in the west must be patient and we must above all support them in what is sure to be a long and at times bloody transition to a real democracy based on rights or all.

Written by harveywalnut

June 25, 2012 at 2:30 pm

The politics and founding of Atheist Ireland

leave a comment »

Written by harveywalnut

April 28, 2012 at 10:25 am

The politics and founding of Atheist Ireland

leave a comment »

Michael Nugent was in primary school when he lost his faith.  While working on a project on the gospels he had an epiphany, “I realised the comic book nature of the bible” So at a very early age Mr. Nugent started questioning the existence of God.  His journey to becoming a fully fledged atheist had begun.

With mass attendance in dramatic decline and the churches’ standing in Irish society severely battered due to the exposure of a litany of sexual abuse cases. The Irish Catholic psyche has suffered blow after blow to its collective faith in the church.  Added to the seemingly never ending reports, Ireland’s societal and financial changes have helped create an entire generation with little or no interest in religion as a part of their life; never before in Ireland has there been as open a space for alternative views on the metaphysical and for the skeptical questioning of the relevance and even the veracity of Judeo – Christian creation stories.  It is into this space Michael Nugent and Atheist Ireland have stepped.

Atheist Ireland as an advocacy group came about organically according to Mr. Nugent.  A friend, Seamus Murnane set up the initial website as a forum for Irish non-believers.  Following much discussion on the website and inspired by renowned atheist Richard Dawkins’s bus campaign, which had 800 London buses running with advertisements stating ‘There’s probably no god so stop worrying and enjoy your life’.  The decision was made to push the site off the screen and into the real world as an advocacy group with a formal political agenda.   Michael Nugent became the chairman and face of the new organisation.

Under Nugent’s chairmanship and using his years of experience as a campaigner against terrorism in Northern Ireland and against the ban in contraception, Atheist Ireland has defined its political agenda and set about the process of raising awareness within the public sphere, both through debates and direct political advocacy based around a secular agenda.

Currently the group is focusing on several major campaigns including the repeal of the blasphemy law, a submission to the council of Europe on protection of national minorities and an ongoing campaign for secular education and the removal of Rule 68; The controversial rule which mandates the inculcation of Christian values to be the main focus of primary school education.

On meeting Mr. Nugent I found him to be affable and erudite.  While being passionate about his advocacy he managed to come across as anything but adversarial, an accusation often aimed at public atheists.  He first talked about Atheist Ireland’s current political agenda.

“Well we have recently put together a list that we have sent to all politicians which we call  ‘5 steps to equal civil rights in a secular Ireland’  and what we’re talking about there is a list of everything we want in terms of secular education, secular constitution, secular parliament, secular government and secular courts.  That’s essentially our political agenda for the foreseeable future.   Separately to that the organisation has two ends; one is to promote atheism and reason over superstition and supernaturalism and we do that through debates, articles and the website and secondly we want to promote a secular state.  These are two different agendas; one we just do with our fellow citizens and are happy that religious people do the same but with regard to the secular part, what we are saying is that the state should stay out of that debate.”

The release of the latest census figures would seem to justify Atheist Irelands campaigns and lend impetus and certainty to their campaign for a more pluralist and secular country.  270,000 Irish people did not identify with any religion, an increase of 45% which at 6% of the population make non – believers the second largest census category after Roman Catholic.

Mr. Nugent however feels that in reality the true figure for non-believers is likely to be much higher based both on the reality of living in a more pluralist Ireland where mass attendance has declined and a leading census question that assumed everyone had a religion and merely asked them what the that religion was.  Many people would have ticked their childhood religion but in reality not be practicing their stated religion and are “culturally Catholic”

When I asked Mr. Nugent about the census and the decline in mass attendance he said  “I think it’s (religion) become a lot less relevant in Ireland and the only person who seems to realize that in the Irish Catholic Church is Archbishop Diarmuid Martin, where as the others seem to be in denial.  But that said religion is still spreading in Africa and South America.  It spreads most effectively where there is poverty.  They will shift their marketing towards those areas.  The more pluralist and secular a society becomes the less religious”.

With the release of the report from the advisory group, the Forum on Patronage and Pluralism in Primary Schools, recommending that initially 50 schools be divested from the Catholic Church around the country and that “faith formation” be thought outside of school hours, it seems that one of Atheist Ireland’s main campaigns is on the way to fruition.

With an estimated 90% of schools in Ireland currently being run by the Catholic Church and an ever more pluralist society, calls from leading politicians and senators such as Ivana Bacik for an overhaul in the education system so as to reflect the new realities of Irish life have been welcomed by Michael Nugent who says with regard to Atheist Irelands education campaign,

“Well tactically we have decided that rather than rely on the argument that secular education is a good thing socially.  We’re focusing on the human rights element, which means under the Irish constitution and all sorts of treaties the Irish Government have signed up to, Irish parents have the right not to have their children indoctrinated in religious beliefs contrary to their own”.  This thinking is very much in line with the Minister for Education, Ruairi Quinn’s own views regarding a pluralist education system.

While there are voices in the Church who agree with the need for such radical change, Archbishop Diarmuid Martin amongst them, there are also those who see this as an attack on their religious freedom and the Catholic character of the state.   So while the campaign for secular education may be headed in the right direction as far as Mr. Nugent is concerned, it is just one of many battles Atheist Ireland will have to fight.

When public intellectuals like Richard Dawkins are being called strident or militant, the question of compromise in the context of such an important social debate becomes paramount.  Mr. Nugent’s position on this is quite clear.

“There isn’t a compromise when it comes to the state but there is plenty of room for compromise when it comes to society.  The distinction is we have a pluralist society where different people have different beliefs and where everybody has a right to their beliefs and a right to manifest their beliefs as long as those beliefs are not interfering in the rights of other people.   In practical terms the only way to equally protect and vindicate every ones rights is for the state to remain neutral.  I would be as opposed to an atheist state as I would be to a religious state”.

Atheist Ireland may be a relatively young advocacy group with just over 400 paid members and around 2,000 passive members, but it is growing with new branches opening in Cork and Limerick.  The change in attitudes to religion, access to information and the increasing liberalisation of Irish society seem to indicate that while young, Atheist Ireland and its secular agenda will continue to grow and to resonate with many in Ireland.  With the increasing disconnection between the Vatican and Irish Catholics, Michael Nugent may one day find himself preaching to the converted, asked where he sees Atheist Ireland going over the next few years he said,

“I used to be involved in a lot of anti terrorists groups.  Our mission essentially was to put ourselves out of business and ideally the same would be true for Atheist Ireland.  The only reason we exist is because it is necessary for us to exist”.

Written by harveywalnut

April 27, 2012 at 3:13 pm

retireediary

The Diary of a Retiree

A Word in Your Ear

Stories and Photographs of my travels, Tales of friends, family, animals and my life

The Past and Present Future

Ken Hinckley's Ideas, Visions, and Opinions on the Research Frontiers of Human Technologies

TED Blog

The TED Blog shares interesting news about TED, TED Talks video, the TED Prize and more.

foreverinfidel

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

The God Debates

Genuinely Intelligent Discussion on Theological Questions

barefootandprimal

You really are what you eat

TheCoevas official blog

Strumentisti di Parole/Musicians of words